Deb, Jim, and Rob on PCTV's Mountain Morning Show

By Lea Hartley Team
Oct 17, 2014

Jim, Deb, and Rob discuss a myriad of topics including the sale of Park City Mountain Resort to Vail and Park City's current hottest home market.

One Wasatch

By Lea Hartley Team
Oct 15, 2014

OneWasatch

 

18,000 acres of skiing, 100 lifts, one lift pass. Sound good? That’s Ski Utah’s plan for the future of northern Utah. While the outcome is not yet certain, resort partners are working together to offer visitors truly unrestrained access to the mighty Wasatch mountains.

Tourism amounts to $7 billion in revenue a year for Utah, 20% of which comes from skiing. The One Wasatch concept would connect seven ski areas (Deer Valley, Park City Mountain Resort, Canyons Resort, Solitude, Brighton, Alta, and Snowbird) in three different drainages (Park City, Big Cottonwood Canyon, Little Cottonwood Canyon). Were the concept to be fully realized, Utah would be the only place in North America to offer a similar experience. One Wasatch would allow Utah and seven of its leading, unique resorts to offer more options to visitors.

Further, having taken into consideration various concerns voiced by local backcountry skiers and ecologists, the new concept has been designed to protect popular backcountry terrain, watershed areas, and minimize ecological footprint.  In a meeting with Berkshire Hathaway Utah Properties this morning, Nathan Rafferty, President and CEO of Ski Utah, shared, “Connecting seven of Utah’s finest ski resorts while preserving both our water quality and a pristine backcountry experience is not an impossible task. With thoughtful planning and sincere cooperation, One Wasatch would add significantly to what is already one of the greatest ski destinations in the world."

Ski Utah and its champions will continue to work closely with Mountain Accordto ensure that the public is made aware of any developments pertaining to the concept and that our pristine environment is kept that way.

The concept would be funded entirely by private parties, costing the general public nothing. Statistical studiessupport the belief that the concept would build upon the already robust Utah ski industry, which amounts to 4.2 million visits a year and 18,000 jobs.

We look forward to the future of Utah's ski industry. It's thrilling to watch the constant evolution of our Wasatch playground.

 

 

Park City Mountain Resort Sells to Vail for $180 Million.

By Lea Hartley Team
Sep 11, 2014

Powdr Corp. has sold its Park City Mountain Resort to Vail Resorts, ending a tumultuous year for Utah's most popular ski destination.

"Selling was the last thing we wanted to do, and while we believe the law around this issue should be changed, a protracted legal battle is not in line with our core value to be good stewards of the resort communities in which we operate," Powdr CEO John Cumming said in a statement. "A sale was the only way to provide long-term certainty for PCMR employees and the Park City community. My family and I are extremely grateful to have had the opportunity to play a role in making PCMR what it is today, and we deeply appreciate the dedicated employees and all of the people who have supported us over the years."

The deal requires Vail Resorts to retain Park City Mountain Resort employees.

Powdr owned the Utah resort for more than 20 years, growing it into one of the most popular ski areas in North America.

According to Vail's Press Relesase, with the acquisition, all aspects of the previously disclosed litigation with respect to PCMR have been settled and this dispute will no longer pose any future threat to disrupt the operation of the resort.

"First and foremost, we are very pleased to bring a permanent end to this dispute and provide assurance to the guests and employees of PCMR, and to everyone in the Park City community, that they no longer have to worry about any disruption to the operation of the Resort. This has been a difficult period for everyone involved and I commend John Cumming and Powdr Corp. for helping to find a solution to this situation," said Rob Katz, chairman and chief executive officer of Vail Resorts.

"Park City Mountain Resort is one of the most spectacular mountain resorts and iconic brands in the ski industry and I am proud to have the resort become a part of Vail Resorts. The acquisition will allow us to immediately bring Park City Mountain Resort onto the Epic Pass, which will now offer skiers from across the country and around the world access to 22 resorts. We look forward to working collaboratively with the entire Park City community, as well as city and county officials, as we chart the future for the resort, including how we can best bring the Canyons and Park City ski experiences together to create the largest mountain resort in the United States," he added.

Mountain operations of PCMR and Canyons will remain separate for the 2014-2015 ski season. However, the Epic Pass and Epic Local Pass will be valid at PCMR. All PCMR passes for the 2014-2015 ski season will continue to be honored and can be exchanged or upgraded for a season pass that will also be valid at Canyons. The majority of all lift tickets sold at either resort will be valid at both PCMR and Canyons.

Park City Mountain Resort to have ski season, resort to pay bond

By Lea Hartley Team
Sep 09, 2014

POSTED 11:49 AM, SEPTEMBER 9, 2014, BY  AND UPDATED AT 12:21PM, SEPTEMBER 9, 2014

PARK CITY, Utah – Park City Mountain Resort will have a ski season.

In a statement to FOX 13, PCMR’s parent company, Powdr Corp., said it would post a court-ordered $17.5 million bond to ensure a 2014-15 ski season.

“Our goal has always been to keep PCMR open for the upcoming 2014-15 season and beyond,” Jenni Smith said, PCMR General Manager. “Paying the bond ordered by the judge will provide our employees, the Park City community and our many guests the certainty they’ve been waiting for about our upcoming ski season.”

The bond being posted is a sigh of relief for the Park City community, which was bracing for a major economic loss if PCMR were to close.

PCMR has been in litigation with the landlord over the mountain, Talisker Holdings.

A judge in Silver Summit’s 3rd District Court ruled PCMR missed a deadline to renew its lease on the mountain.

Talisker wants to evict PCMR and bring in Vail Resorts, which operates the nearby Canyons resort.

Complicating matters is the fact that PCMR owns the base of the mountain, including the parking lots, buildings and other infrastructure.

The judge ordered both sides into mediation, but so far no deal has been reached.

In the statement to FOX 13, Smith expressed hope those talks would continue.

“I am very happy that the resort will be open this year,” Smith said. “While the most important outcome today is that PCMR will be open for business, the bond payment is only a short-term solution for the 2014/15 season. As such, we will continue working with Vail toward a reasonable and fair long-term solution.”

Source

Park City Says Mountain Lease Worth No More Than $1 Million A Year

By Lea Hartley Team
Aug 20, 2014

Park City Mountain Resort, in a filing with the Utah court overseeing litigation with Vail Resorts MTN -1.24% over a disputed lease, said it shouldn’t have to pay more than $1 million a year for the 3,000 acres that constitute most of the skiable acreage on the mountain.

Park City and Vail were required to present arguments for how much the mountain is worth so the Summit County court can set a bond as Park City pursues an appeal of a previous order evicting it from the land. The filing suggests the two are still very far apart on the numbers; landowner Talisker Corp. was demanding $7.7 million a year, Park City said, before it entered into a $25 million-a-year lease arrangement with Vail under which the Colorado ski resort operator took over control of the litigation.

In its filing with the court, Talisker asked for half of Park City’s earnings from the mountain, which it redacted  because it said it was supplied the information on a non-public basis. (Based on the size of the blacked-out text and other comments in the filing, it’s seeking at least double-digit millions.) Talisker and Vail also want the  equivalent of treble damages which they are entitled to if they win. At the very least the company asked for rent that from other indications in the redacted filing suggest $14-$15 million a year.

READ MORE

What's new in Park City Utah Real Estate?

By Lea Hartley Team
Aug 05, 2014

Judge grants eviction of Park City Mountain Resort

By Lea Hartley Team
Jun 22, 2014

PARK CITY, Utah — A judge has signed an order that clears the way for Park City Mountain Resort to be evicted from the mountain.

At the end of a hearing over the eviction issue in Silver Summit’s 3rd District Court on Thursday, Judge Ryan Harris granted a request by Talisker Land Holdings to evict PCMR. However, the judge halted enforcement of that order until August 27 and ordered both sides to go into mediation.

“I think it would be in everyone’s best interest,” he told a packed courtroom. “I think you all owe it to the folks who are dependent on this resort operating in something close to what it’s done — businesses, the community…”

In a ruling last month, Judge Harris said that PCMR missed a key deadline to renew its lease on the mountain. At Thursday’s hearing, Talisker, which is the landlord over the mountain, urged the judge to sign the eviction order.

“They make millions off our property, which they don’t have any right to be on,” Talisker attorney John Lund told the judge.

Evicting Park City Mountain Resort is easier said than done. While Talisker owns the slopes, PCMR owns the base of the mountain — including the ski lifts, the parking lot and much of the development around it.

“These parties are bound at the hip and this is a resort that is integrated with the Talisker land and the PCMR land and we have to make a deal,” PCMR attorney Alan Sullivan said outside court.

Read more

Planking for joy!

By Lea Hartley Team
Jun 05, 2014

Jim Lea, Deb Hartley, and Rob Lea celebrate the transition to Berkshire Hathaway Home Services! Jim Lea, Deb Hartley, and Rob Lea celebrate the transition to Berkshire Hathaway Home Services!

Woodward Park City planning continues

By Lea Hartley Team
May 01, 2014

Parking issues scrutinized by the Planning Commission Alan Maguire, The Park Record

20140425__4 woodward~p1_500

 

Woodward Park City was the big topic before city planners this week. On Wednesday, during a Park City Planning Commission meeting, Park City Mountain Resort revealed more details for its planned action-sports complex.

Woodward Park City will be "an action sports mountain training center and camp hosting a spectrum of programs for skateboarding, BMX, cheer, snowboarding, skiing, and digital media. The facility and campus will house trampolines, a skate park, foam pits, ramps, jumps, a pump track, a media lab, lounge, and more," according to the project description submitted to the Planning Commission when it was publicly unveiled in November.

In order to construct the Woodward building, PCMR is asking the Planning Commission to approve modifications to an overall development approval, including reallocating density rights between different parcels of land in the base area.

That overall development approval, approved by the city in 1997, allows for construction of commercial, residential, retail and operational space totaling over 1 million square feet. The lands include both of the existing parking lots at PCMR's base.

Woodward Park City would be constructed at the south end of the parking lot east of Lowell Avenue, adjacent to the Legacy Lodge and near the First Time lift.

PCMR's presentation to the Planning Commission on Wednesday included details of the architectural design for the Woodward facility but centered on ski-season parking analyses.

The Woodward facility would eliminate approximately 220-230 parking spaces at the base area. PCMR estimates the facility would itself require around 50 parking spaces in the winter season.

PCMR representatives told the Planning Commission on Wednesday on-site parking capacity has only been exceeded about two days each winter over the past five ski seasons, although shuttles running to overflow parking lots at Park City High School operate 25 days a season. They forecast that the on-site capacity will be exceeded approximately 20 days each season - a 10-fold increase - once Woodward Park City construction begins.

Planning Commissioner Steve Joyce said his experience is that capacity is exceeded "a lot more" than two days a season. His biggest concern, he said, is the impact of overflow parking on the surrounding neighborhood.

"I know it's there, I see it, I'm subject to it sometimes," he said.

Planning Commissioner John Phillips agreed with Joyce's concerns while another panel member, Preston Campbell, pushed back a bit, saying that overflow parking would be "self-regulating" because nobody would want to fix the parking situation more than PCMR. He added that concerns about the parking situation should not obscure the economic benefits the Woodward facility would be expected to bring to the community.

"Our job is not to make PCMR more profitable," Joyce responded. "That's not our Planning Commission job. That's the chamber of commerce, and we're not them."

"I agree," said Nann Worel, chair of the Planning Commission.

The current maximum number of off-site parking spaces available to PCMR is 799, according to the resort. That figure includes lots at the high school as well as lots at McPolin Elementary and Treasure Mountain Junior High School.

The Planning Commission inquired about PCMR's parking arrangement with the schools. Jenni Smith, president and general manager of PCMR, clarified that the resort does not have a lease with the schools, but rather a less-formal three-year agreement.

Planning Commissioner Stewart Gross said PCMR needs to make sure the agreement with the schools is extended.

"That needs to be in hand so we know what to expect" over the next five to seven years, Gross said.

Smith indicated PCMR will initiate that task.

As part of the base area redevelopment, PCMR is planning to construct a multi-level parking and transit facility that will have pedestrian overpasses leading directly to the mountain. That project would follow Woodward Park City and be implemented "over the next five years," according to Michael Barille of PlanWorks Design, who is leading the project.

PCMR estimates an approximately 18-month construction schedule for the Woodward facility.

For further details about the Woodward project and PCMR's larger base-area redevelopment, visit woodwardparkcity.com and masterplan.pcmr.com.

 
 
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